Equipment

My ultimate kitchen necessities. Korean cooking has never been easier!

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Blender

Blender

Blenders are not essential; however, a handheld blender can be useful when making marinades, mashing mung beans for pancakes, and for blitzing soy beans for soups.

Cast Iron Pot

Cast Iron Pot

A cast iron pot is great for braising as it locks in moisture and retains heat evenly. It’s the perfect tool for making Korean hot pots, stews and soups. Keep it on a low heat to prevent food from catching.

Ceramic Bowl (Ttukbaegi)

Ceramic Bowl (Ttukbaegi)

These Korean earthenware bowls are designed for cooking and/or serving stews and soups as they are excellent heat retainers. Traditionally, Ttukbaegi arrives at the table bubbling and steaming.

Chopsticks

Chopsticks

Chopsticks are great utensils for eating with, and for cooking. Cooking chopsticks are longer and usually made from a material low in temperature conduction, such as bamboo. Of course, they are not vital when cooking Korean food, but chopsticks can be useful when dealing with items that need precise turning, such as dumplings.

Colander

colander

A large colander or strainer is useful for rinsing and washing large portions of vegetables, including cabbage leaves when making Kimchi; and straining noodles.

Food Processor

Food Processor

This is a fundamental item in any Korean kitchen because it saves so much time! Korean cooking involves a lot of chopping, grating, slicing and mincing, and so a decent quality food processor is a valuable piece of kit, and great for making kimchi paste.

Gloves

Gloves

Korean cooking is very hands on. To create this soul food, one is required to get their hands dirty and connect with the ingredients. Sense of touch is just as important as smelling, seeing and tasting when preparing food in Korea. Gloves are not mandatory, but come in handy when dealing with chillies, raw meats and fish, and making kimchi.

Griddle Pan

Griddle Pan

While not essential, griddle pans are sometimes fun to use as they leave meats, fish and vegetables with beautifully charred lines and a smoky aroma. They are also a great alternative to gas or charcoal grills when preparing a Korean style barbecue.

Hotteok Press

Hotteok Press

Hottoek is a sweet donut-like pancake that is usually filled with sugar and cinnamon. This crispy delicacy is a sought-after Korean street-food snack. Because they are so popular and widely made at home, Koreans have a special tool to help create the perfect shaped pancake.

Large Cast Iron Pan

Large Cast Iron Pan

Cast iron pans are preferable than non-stick pans because they last longer, are not easily scratched, and overall sturdier. They are also excellent heat retainers and so work well for stir-fries.

Mandolin Slicer

Mandolin Slicer

Having a mandolin slicer is always convenient. There are many dishes in Korean cuisine that require thinly sliced vegetables for salads and pickling. A mandolin slicer will win the battle of consistency over a knife any day.

Measuring Spoons

Measuring Spoons

Measuring spoons allow for accuracy. They are useful when following Korean recipes due to the large number of different ingredients spices used.

Microplane

Microplane

Microplane is a brand, and any grater is better than no grater! Microplanes tend to have extremely sharp blades, and so are superior. It is useful to have a Microplane to mince garlic, grate ginger, and zest limes.

Mixing Bowls

Mixing Bowls

Mixing bowls are imperative in any cuisine, but especially in Korean cuisine due to the large volume and array of ingredients used. Having an assortment of various sizes will always be useful.

Onggi

Onggi

Onggi is a Korean earthenware widely used to store fermented foods including kimchi, gochujang and doenjang. Its microporous clay walls draw in oxygen and push out impurities, aiding the fermentation process.

Peelers

Peelers

Having a good vegetable peeler makes life a lot easier. Peelers are great kitchen utensils and are used a lot in Korean cooking, whether for peeling daikon or carrots, or Asian pears, you will use a good sharp peeler often.

Rice bowls

Rice bowls

Koreans like to serve rice in bowls with lids to keep the rice warm. They are the perfect size to cradle a portion of freshly steamed rice.

Rice Cooker

Rice Cooker

Rice is a staple in Korea and so every household will have a rice cooker to guarantee perfectly plump and fluffy rice every time. Nowadays, rice cookers are also pressure cookers that can make juk (congee) and various other dishes too. They are worth the investment.

Rice rolling mats

Rice rolling mats

These bamboo mats are an essential tool to make easy and quick kimbap rice rolls. They can also be used for shaping other soft foods such as omelettes.

Scale

Scale

A kitchen scale eliminates the need for a clutter of various measuring cups. Top tip: milligrams (ml) are equal to grams (g) when measuring certain liquids like water. So, 250 ml of water can be measured as 250g on a scale.

Scallion cutter

Scallion cutter

This simple yet swanky tool is used for shredding scallions/spring onions. It is inexpensive, and allows home cooks to easily produce restaurant quality scallion wisps for salads and garnishes.

Scissors

Scissors

A sharp pair of scissors is of course essential. Koreans use them to cut just about everything, from meat and fish to Kimchi and vegetables.

Sharp Knives

Sharp Knives

A blunt, cheap knife is not only difficult to work with, but can also be seriously dangerous. Investing in a good set of knives will turn chopping from a chore to a joy.

Skewers

Skewers

Many Korean street-food delicacies involve skewering. From meat to seafood to rice cakes, having a bag of skewers at home is always useful, especially when hosting a Korean barbeque.

Spatula

Spatula

Of course, a spatula is a must-have kitchen utensil. It especially comes in handy when flipping jeon (Korean pancakes) and Hottoek (Korean sweet pancakes).

Stock Strainer/Infusers

Stock Strainer/Infusers

Korean stock strainers look and work similar to tea strainers. They usually comprise a stainless-steel basket which clasps together to hold herbs, dried anchovies, kelp, and other ingredients needed to flavour stock. After the flavour has boiled out, the contents of the strainer will be bitter and so are discarded.

Steamers

Steamers

There are many types of steamers that one can use for Korean cooking. It boils down to personal preference. Bamboo and stainless-steel steamers are great for dumplings, buns and vegetables, although stainless-steel steamers are usually easier to clean.

Stone Bowl (Dolsot)

Stone Bowl (Dolsot)

A Korean Dolsot is a granite stone bowl used for serving an array of hot dishes, including bap (rice) bibimbap (Korean mixed rice) and various stews and soups. Dolsots are brilliant heat retainers and so dishes arrive at the table steaming and sizzling.

Food photo created by freepik - www.freepik.com

Social media

@judyjoochef Instagram profile imageOMG!! What an epic fantastic meal @koynlondon last night for their opening. @samyuktanair has done it again— worked her magic and created a truly divine venue in the heart of Mayfair. The main upstairs room is intimate with a clean modern decor, while the downstairs has a bit more of a fun “sceney” vibe.  I do consider myself a bit of sushi and Japanese food snob, and I was wonderfully impressed. With chef @rhyscattermoul and @salvatoredettori78 at the helm, I was spoiled silly with truly interesting dishes with unexpected and wonderfully surprising twists. Very few Japanese restaurants have both a strong sushi bar AND a kitchen— Koyn’s cooked dishes are a shining star here. Even classic plates, such as Agedashi Tofu and Spinach Oshitashi boast unique finishing touches that makes them so memorable. I loved the Hojicha Smoked Lamb Chops— succulent and bursting with umami flavor, with just the right amount of char to give it that addictive sweet and savory caramelization. The sukiyaki was another highlight— a usually homey dish was elevated with Wagyu beef and a rich complex broth echoing with subtle sweetness. The scallops were also excellent— meaty, juicy and cooked delicately with an almost raw and creamy center and glazed with a sour sweet ume (plum). Oh, and i cannot forget the Chilean Seabass— one of my favorite types of fish and so rarely found on menus in London. Also known as Patagonian Toothfish, this oily, buttery, practically silky white fish tastes so luxurious. And, then when slathered decadently with a aromatic and spiced Shiso Salsa Verde— What a treat!! I cannot wait to go back.  Thank you so much @frasercomms and @samyuktanair for having me in. 
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#japan #japanesefood  #chef #chefslife #london #mayfair #londonrestaurants #koyn #foodofinstagram #foodoftheday #sukiyaki #eatingout3 days ago via Instagram
@judyjoochef Instagram profile imageSuch a fun night @vamuseum checking out the opening of the Korean Wave “Hallyu” exhibit. K-pop, fashion, dramas, movies— they even recreated the bathroom from Parasite @parasitemovie !
And, great to see my book too in the gift shop!  Yay! 
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#korea #korean #koreanwave #museums #victoriaandalbertmuseum #hallyu4 days ago via Instagram
@judyjoochef Instagram profile imageRepost from @seoulbirduk
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Seoul Bird is spreading her wings again, and this time she's heading to LAS VEGAS! 🇺🇲

Read all about it here - https://www.forbes.com/sites/alywalansky/2022/09/20/the-las-vegas-strip-has-a-cool-new-must-try-food-hall/?sh=2526e0886ecf @forbes @propereatslasvegas
@arialv 
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#seoulbird #seoulbirduk #lasvegasstrip #lasvegas #ariaresort #koreancocktails #koreanburger #koreanfriedchicken #koreanfood5 days ago via Instagram
@judyjoochef Instagram profile imageRepost from @seoulbirduk
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🇺🇲 VIVA LAS VEGAS! 🇺🇲

We've been working on something VERY exciting in the background and today we can finally tell you! 

Seoul Bird presents its very first location outside London at the @propereatslasvegas food hall this December 2022.

At Proper Eats, Seoul Bird dishes include K-Tots topped with melted cheese, kimchi and hot sauce, and a signature fried chicken sandwich with signature sauce and Kewpie mayonnaise.

The new 24,000 square feet food hall on the second level promenade of ARIA Resort & Casino will be a food hall like none any of us have seen before, and it’s located right in the heart of the Las Vegas Strip. So whether stopping by the bar or grabbing some food after a busy night in the casino, this will be a fun spot to wander into when staying on Las Vegas Strip! 

✈️🇺🇲🥢
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#lasvegas #seoulbird
#seoulbirduk #koreanstreetfood #lasvegasstrip #koreanburger
#koreanfriedchicken #propereatsfoodhall #propereats #vegas  #comingsoon #ariaresort #aria #vegasstrip #forbes6 days ago via Instagram
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