Galbi Steak Pie

Skip to recipe

Steak pies are ubiquitous in Britain, and I have grown to relish these dense pastry parcels packed with meat, sometimes eaten cold. So I created this Galbi version that is a cross between American pot pies and the English pies I have had in London. It turned out so well – a richer, thicker, more savoury version of Galbijjim, a Korean short rib stew, kicked up with Guinness beer!

The ultimate steak pie

Ingredients

Serves 2-4

  • 700g (1lb 9oz) short ribs of beef, cut into 2.5cm (1in) cubes
  • 50g (2oz) plain flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 25g (1oz) butter
  • vegetable oil
  • 2 medium onions, cut into 3cm (11⁄4in)
  • dice 1 tsp ginger, grated
  • 1 tsp garlic, grated
  • 150ml (5fl oz) Guinness beer
  • 120ml (4fl oz) soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp mirin
  • 1 tbsp roasted sesame oil
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 300ml (10fl oz) beef stock
  • 185g (61⁄2oz) baby potatoes
  • 2 large carrots, peeled, halved lengthways and cut into half moons
  • 175g (6oz) mixed mushrooms, trimmed and halved if large
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 egg
  • 275g (10oz) puff pastry
  • sea salt

Method

  1. Dust the steak cubes in the flour and set aside.
  2. In a heavy-based pan set over medium–high heat, melt the butter and add a drizzle of oil. Add the onions, ginger and garlic and cook until softened and lightly golden brown.
  3. Place the steak in the pan and sear on all sides until browned.
  4. Drain any excess oil from the pan, and add the Guinness, soy sauce, mirin, sesame oil, sugar and beef stock. Bring to the boil.
  5. Add the potatoes, carrots and mushrooms, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for a further 1 1⁄2 hours until the meat is very tender.
  6. Add the black pepper and season with salt to taste. Allow to cool completely.
  7. Preheat the oven to 170°C fan/190°C/375°F/gas 5. Spoon the mixture into a 900ml (13⁄4 pint) dolsot bowl, or another ovenproof dish.
  8. Crack the egg in a small bowl, add a splash of water and beat well to make an egg wash.
  9. Roll out the puff pastry to a 3mm (1⁄8in) thick round, about 1cm (1⁄2in) wider than the bowl or dish, moisten rim of dish with the egg wash, and place the pastry on top, sealing the edges well. Cut away any excess pastry and brush with egg wash. If you wish, add any decorative touches with the pastry trimmings and brush with egg wash.
  10. Bake for 1–11⁄2 hours until the pastry is golden brown and the filling is hot. Serve immediately.

Browse all recipes

Social media

@judyjoochef Instagram profile image#AD Episode one of 'Cooking With Contrasting Flavours' is now live, check out my stories and get access to the full episode and recipes, which you can make at home. 

We're paying tribute to Orkney, the beautiful island home of Highland Park, and have explored two delcious scallop recipes, one created by me and one by Chef @ChefJamesCochran, using special ingredients from Orkney. 

We've explored a range of contrasting flavours inspired by Highland Park whisky which came together beautifully.

Please enjoy responsibly 
#HighlandPark #AWildHarmony #21+2 days ago via Instagram
@judyjoochef Instagram profile imageI have a serious addiction to “pastel de nata” (translates to “cream pastry”)— traditional Portuguese egg custard tarts. So so good.  I’ve never had them with the custard so silky and fresh… and a little packet of cinnamon to dust on top liberally. Flaky delicate crust, baked to the perfect crispiness.  I could eat a dozen of these! 
.
These tarts were apparently invented by local monks who used egg whites to starch their clothing and fabrics. They ultimately ended up with an excess of egg yolks.  So, they looked for a way to use them up and pastel de nata was born. 
.
These pastries are similar to the custard tarts found in China. They were brought over by European traders traveling to Guangzhou, China.  Nowadays, you’ll find two varieties of custard tarts in China.  The ones in China and Hong Kong are usually smaller and bright yellow on top, while the ones in Macau (a former Portuguese colony) resemble their Portuguese counterparts more boasting a dark caramelized top. 
I love them all!! 
.
@manteigaria.oficial @lisbon.travel @lisbon__insiders #pasteldenata #nata #custard #chef #chefslife #judyjoo #pastry #dessert #foodoftheday #foodofinstagram #foodie #portugal #portuguese5 days ago via Instagram
@judyjoochef Instagram profile imageMy dad and mom have landed in London!  It was their first international flight since Covid.  My dad’s first meal in London always has to be fish and chips @thegoldenhindmarylebone .  We had cod and haddock. Delish!  They are a family run business and have been trading since 1914! 
.
.
#fishandchips @marylebonevillage #britishfood #fish #eatlocal #supportlocalbusiness1 week ago via Instagram
Loading